Welcome to iS.T.A.R.


San Antonio Astronomical Association invites you to share the wonder and excitement of astronomy.

The members of the San Antonio Astronomical Association enjoy exploring, observing, and learning about the objects in our solar system and beyond. We want to share our experience with you. From beginner to professional astronomer, with or without a telescope, we invite you to join us in this exciting and rewarding endeavor.

SAAA in the Community

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SAAA Monthly Meeting

Come join us for our monthly meeting on 10 July at Christ Lutheran Church of Alamo Heights, 6720 Broadway,Alamo Heights, TX 78209. Our Novice Meeting … Continue reading

YaleAstronomy

Yale University’s Astronomy 160 Course – Free

San Antonio Astronomical Association via Orion Telescopes & Binoculars via Facebook Yale University’s Astronomy 160 course free content in itunes. Astronomy: Frontiers and Controversies – … Continue reading

Astronomy club

Astronomy in the Park

Come on out to Astronomy in the Park.  See some stars.  See five planets.  See the Galilean Moons.  See the Rings of Saturn.  See the … Continue reading


  • SAAA Monthly Meeting


      Come join us for our monthly meeting on 10 July at Christ Lutheran Church of Alamo Heights, 6720 Broadway,Alamo Heights, TX 78209.

      Our Novice Meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

      Our General Meeting begins at 7:30 p.m., this month’s topic is “Impact Structures and Craters of Texas”, presented by Dwight Jurena.

      Mr. Jurena is a long time member of the SAAA. He has earned a Bachelor of Science in Geology from UTSA in 1990 and a Masters of Science in Geology (specialization in planetary science) from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 2002. His thesis title was “The Bee Bluff Structure, A Probable Impact Structure Located in South Texas”. He is an adjunct instructor in geology at San Antonio College (2004-2015) and is currently supervising field research (summer undergraduate research project) at the Bee Bluff structure as a continuation of his thesis work.

      This meeting is free and open to the public.

  • Yale University’s Astronomy 160 Course – Free


    San Antonio Astronomical Association via Orion Telescopes & Binoculars via Facebook

    Yale University’s Astronomy 160 course free content in itunes.
    Astronomy: Frontiers and Controversies – Download Free Content from Yale University on iTunes
    itunes.apple.com

    Download or subscribe to free content from Astronomy: Frontiers and Controversies by Yale University on iTunes.

  • Astronomy in the Park


    Come on out to Astronomy in the Park.  See some stars.  See five planets.  See the Galilean Moons.  See the Rings of Saturn.  See the “canals” of Mars.   Get Mooned by the Moon.

    Astronomy in the Park, presented by the San Antonio Astronomical Association, is the longest running public star party in the San Antonio Metro area.  It is held each Wednesday from 8:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. at the Lower Bee Tree Soccer Field parking lot at McAllister Park, 13102 Jones Maltsberger Road, weather permitting.  [Map]

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15 thoughts on “Welcome to iS.T.A.R.”

  1. I comment when I especially enjoy a article on a site or I have something to contribute to the conversation. Usually it is caused by the fire communicated in the article I browsed. And after this article

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  3. My daughter is wanting a telescope but I know nothing about them or where to get one. We are new to SA so I would greatly appreciate it if someone could assist me. She is 10 just looking for something basic not cheap stuff just a good entry level

    1. You would probably want to go to Analytical Scientific on Bandera Rd just about 1/2 mile east of 1604. Sorry, I don’t have the street address with me. There you will find some very good quality telescopes from beginner to advanced amateur. You know your daughter better than I do, obviously, but if she is really interested, get her one that won’t have her bored and frustrated within 3 months. I would recommend an 8″ reflector by Orion. She will be able to see more than the full moon with that. Don’t forget that she will need a couple of eyepieces and perhaps a nebula filter or two. She will also need a planisphere and a decent star charet or atlas. Sky & Telescope publishes a “pocket” guide that has everything in it that she would need. It sells for about $20.00. Good luck and keep her enthused. It will pay off in later times.

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